A Sacrifice To The Neo-Liberal Order: Senate Moves Forward With Trump’s Retroactive Impeachment

Support SouthFront

A Sacrifice To The Neo-Liberal Order: Senate Moves Forward With Trump's Retroactive Impeachment

Click to see full-size image

On January 25th, US President Joe Biden offered his two cents on the situation around former President Donald Trump’s impeachment.

“I think it has to happen,” he said, about retroactively impeaching Trump.

Biden made the comment during a brief one-on-one interview with CNN in the halls of the West Wing.

He admitted that it would have an effect on his legislative agenda and Cabinet nominees but said there would be “a worse effect if it didn’t happen.”

He said that he believed the outcome would be different if Trump had six months left in his term, but said he doesn’t think 17 Republican senators will vote to convict Trump.

“The Senate has changed since I was there, but it hasn’t changed that much,” Biden said.

Prior to assuming the presidential seat, Biden released a statement on the matter.

He called the US Senate vote “a bipartisan vote cast by members who followed the Constitution and their conscience.”

“This nation also remains in the grip of a deadly virus and a reeling economy,” Biden said at the time. “I hope that the Senate leadership will find a way to deal with their Constitutional responsibilities on impeachment while also working on the other urgent business of this nation.”

Chief Justice John Roberts will not be presiding like he did for Trump’s first impeachment trial, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

Instead, Sen. Patrick Leahy, the president pro tempore of the Senate, is expected to preside, the sources said.

This is the case because Trump is no longer president, and there’s no need for the Chief Justice to lead the proceedings.

The US House of Representatives voted on January 14th to impeach Trump, but then waited until January 25th to begin the next step.

House managers read the single article of impeachment aloud on the House floor and then walking it over to the Senate.

Some Republicans are against the impeachment trial, not because they support the Capitol building storming, and they likely, too, blame Trump for it, but they see no point in carrying it out.

“I think so many are getting confused by the fact that we’re doing this,” said Indiana Republican Sen. Mike Braun, the Indiana Republican.

Republican Senator Mitt Romney, said that he might vote to impeach Trump if that meant unity in the US.

“And, you know, if we’re going to have unity in our country, I think it’s important to recognize the need for accountability, for truth and justice,” he said on Fox News Sunday, arguing there is a need for a Senate trial.

Former Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might quietly be hoping to purge Trump from the GOP, there’s a much louder effort to purge Republicans who opposed the insurrection and cast blame upon Trump.

Republicans who support the impeachment and condemn the Capitol building storming more avidly are welcome.

The Biden Administration and the Democratic grip on all power in the US wants to fully cut ties with the old, and make way for the new.

Trump is the first president in history to face impeachment twice. He was impeached last year over allegations he abused to his office to pressure Ukraine into investigating his political opponents, then candidate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. It’s, naturally, time for payback.

This retroactive impeachment makes way for other retroactive impeachments such as these. Democrats could decide that wish to impeach long-dead presidents because they didn’t abolish slavery, or for other misconduct. Rewriting history could become a new main stable of the internal policy.

MORE ON THE TOPIC:

Support SouthFront

8 comments

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *